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May-June 2013

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NAVIGATE RESOURCES: Table of Contents InfoNet aila.org Find a Member ? ! Contact a Mentor Shop Agora FOR MORE ON CRIME: a removal case if the person has no status. If the authorities in the perpetrator's home country have the willingness and capacity to pursue charges, DOJ can facilitate extradition. O'Connor encourages AILA attorneys to spread the word to their clients. "What we're focusing on is the conduct of the human rights violator. We are not focused on the immigration status of the victim or the witness," she said. "[A]ssuming there is a victim or a witness who is undocumented, but has suffered persecution and comes forward to work with us on putting together a prosecution, the U.S. government has tools available to assist in that way, so there are U visas for victims and S visas for witnesses. … We also work closely with U.S. Attorney's Offices throughout the United States and each of those offices has a Victim-Witness Unit within the office" in order to ensure that the concerns of the victim or witness are addressed before proceeding with the case. "We take all of the referrals very seriously, but we work closely with our law enforcement compo- time to meet with some of [the representatives] because they are in this period of transition and might need that extra push," he said. One attendee, Palma Yanni, counsel at Dickstein Shapiro and past AILA president, emphasized that families and employment go hand-in-hand, so CIR should address both. "It's not employment vs. family," Yanni said. "Two [of my clients, who are Extraordinary Ability immigrants,] Immigration Consequences of Criminal Activity Purchase > Immigration Consequences of Criminal Offenses (Recording) Purchase > And You Thought You Were Done: Advanced Issues for Ts & Us (Recording) Purchase > nents, both within the Department—that would be the FBI's Genocide and War Crimes Unit—as well as within the Department of Homeland Security – HSI's Human Rights Violators and War Crimes Unit, to vet those referrals [and] tips to ensure that they're credible and corroborated by other evidence." have now left the U.S. because they were the head of their family and they couldn't bring their family back. So, there's no separation between the family cases and the employment, because, in order to keep our contributing employment-based immigrants, they have to know that they can reunite with their families." "There's a transformation on the Hill now. Every office you go in, whichever chamber and whichever party, they say 'We have to do something.'" Several attorneys voiced frustration over the three– and ten-year bars, which, they say, have M AY/ J UNE 2013 35

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