Immigration Practice News

June 2014 (Vol. 5, No. 4)

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COPYRIGHT © 2014 AMERICAN IMMIGRATION LAWYERS ASSOCIATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. NO PART OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE REPRINTED OR OTHERWISE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE EXPRESS PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER. SEND REPRINT REQUESTS TO PUBS@AILA.ORG FOLLOW AILA FOR THE LATEST ON IMMIGRATION! YOUTUBE, TWITTER, FACEBOOK, and LINKEDIN MISS AN ISSUE? No Sweat. Check out AILA's archive. www.aila.org 6 Invest a few minutes this summer when client works slows to implement a couple of these practical nuggets to improve your practice. Is Unorganized Clutter Costing You Clients? Workplace environment specialists (who knew there was such a thing!) advocate clean desks to improve workspace productivity. In an office there is both workspace and storage space; workspace should never be used for storage. So, put "cute" items and most pictures on a shelf, store unneeded files (nearby if you feel more comfortable), have a suitable container for pens, notepad, and business cards, and use a vertical file sorter to prevent stacks of files from growing on your desk. e goal is to see 80% of your desk surface. The Value of Training Do not skimp on training yourself and staff to use new and/or existing soware applications—it is penny-wise and pound-foolish. Training helps your firm get the most out of your technology investment. Each staff member needs a minimum of 6-12 hours per year just to keep up with soware changes and enhancements. Training can even be free—take advantage of free online training offered by many soware providers, including Microso Office training videos. You can also subscribe to Lynda. com for a small fee and learn innovative techniques to increase your productivity through online video courses. Take a Walk in Your Clients' Shoes Walk through the front door of your firm as if you were walking in as a client for the first time. What do you see? What do you feel? Go step-by-step from the initial greeting through the end of the appointment. Are you satisfied with what you see, hear and feel? What changes can be made to improve the client experience? Make a list of improvements to make over the next few weeks or months. Practical Tips for a Productive Summer Are you an immigrant? Do you have a compelling story? Place your story front and center on your "About" page on your website or blog. Clients will feel a stronger connection to you than if you merely list your professional credentials. Build appropriate stories into your initial client interview. is is the best time to make personal connections with your potential clients to show you care, understand their situations, and to highlight your effectiveness in dealing with legal issues. Find other times throughout the client service process to add stories as appropriate. Having trouble getting a client to act in his or her best interest? Share a story that highlights what can happen if they take another course or procrastinate too long. Take the time to create some new stories or improve some of the ones you now use. Remember, they must be appropriate to the situation, relevant to the client, and not too long in duration. Like anything, summoning your inner storyteller will take a bit of practice, but will pay dividends in your practice. Reid Trautz is Director of AILA's Practice & Professionalism Center. STORYTELLING from pg.5 >>

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