Immigration Practice News

Volume 3, Issue 2

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Practice News N I IPNmmigration American Immigration Lawyers Association www.aila.org Vol. 3 Issue 2 ATTEND AILA'S OPEN HOUSE! + GET A (TWITTER) HANDLE ON #IMMIGRATION ISSUES In addition to @AILANational, don't forget to follow AILA Executive Director Crystal Williams (@AILAExecDir) and the American Immigration Council's Immigration Policy Center (@ImmPolicyCenter) for the latest #immigration news. What Keeps Firm Owners Up at Night By Kirby Joseph obody cares more about the success or failure of a law firm than the owners. Law firm employees cannot ap- preciate the number of sleepless nights that owners have brewing about what is the proper way to handle firm finances, staffing issues, administrative issues, cli- ent issues … and the list goes on and on. As owners, we have the responsibility of keeping the firm and our employees healthy, pro- ductive and happy so that we can provide quality customer service and expert legal representation to our clients. This is not always an easy job and things aren't always as easy as they might appear. Visit the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) national headquarters in Washington, D.C. for our 4th Annual Open House on Friday, February 17, 2012 from 8.00 am to 4.00 pm. Network with colleagues, earn CLE credits, and more! Over the past 14 years, I have had many sleepless nights tossing and turning, balancing the best interest of the firm with the best interest of all of its employees and clients. Worrying about keeping my staff happy is probably what keeps me up most at night. I recognize that in order for my firm to be success- "Worrying about keeping my staff happy is probably what keeps me up most at night. I recognize that in order for my firm to be successful I have to have employees that want the firm to be successful. ..." ful I have to have employees that want the firm to be successful and are committed to working to make this a reality. Happy staff translates to happy clients. There are times that I have to play the role of the boss and establish guidelines, policies and procedures for everyone to follow. This is not always welcomed by employees. Most people have their own way of doing things and it is difficult to adapt to the style of another. As an owner I must always balance my personal way of doing things with the way that others like to do things. I have the final word on how things are done within the firm, but I must listen to the sug- gestions of others in the firm and be open to their ideas. I always try to keep in mind that working to- gether as a team always leads to the best results for everyone. Owners struggle to find the bal- ance between being a boss and being a friend. When I first be- gan hiring staff, my management CONTINUED on pg.3 >> www.aila.org 1

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